Colorado Pedestrian Accident Attorney

What is the Distinction Between Pedestrian and Motor Vehicle Accidents?

With Colorado’s 300 days of annual sunshine, many people prefer to walk than ride in a car or take public transportation. However, as the number of pedestrians grow, so does the probability of a pedestrian accident. When a motor vehicle collides with a pedestrian, the results are almost always disastrous. Our pedestrian accident attorney is here to help!

colorado pedestrian accident attorneys

Even though motor vehicles are frequently involved in accidents with other motor vehicles, pedestrian accidents are distinct because a pedestrian is more likely to sustain a serious injury. As a result, it is critical to speak with a Colorado pedestrian accident lawyer who can examine the facts of your case and assist you in constructing the best claim possible.

The primary distinction between a pedestrian and an automobile accident is that when a pedestrian is struck, they have no protection whatsoever. When a pedestrian is struck by a motor vehicle that weighs thousands of pounds and travels at a high rate of speed, the collision is a violent mismatch. As such, significantly more damage is done on the pedestrian’s body than on someone who was a seat-belted driver or passenger in another motor vehicle.

As a result, it is simple to see how an automobile accident involving a pedestrian, even one that occurs at a low or moderate speed, might result in serious injuries.

Pedestrian Accident Protections

The responsibility for preventing pedestrian-vehicle collisions should not be exclusively on drivers. Walkers must also exercise caution.

Colorado Law

The relevant statute pertaining to pedestrian right-of-way in crosswalks can be found in Section 42-4-802 of the Colorado Revised Statutes. Walkers must also exercise caution.

Pedestrians HAVE the right-of-way in the following situations:

  • A marked crosswalk with no traffic control signal or an inoperable signal. Drivers must slow down or stop to yield if the pedestrian is crossing the roadway within the marked crosswalk and the vehicle cannot pass without making the pedestrian feel in danger.
  • A vehicle is stopped at an intersection with a marked or unmarked crosswalk. A second vehicle cannot pass the first vehicle if the first vehicle stopped to allow a pedestrian to cross the street, even if it is unclear if the pedestrian had the right-of-way.
  • A pedestrian control signal that reads “Walk” or shows the equivalent symbol. Vehicles must yield the right-of-way to pedestrians crossing with a steady “Walk” signal.
  • A pedestrian control signal that begins to flash “Don’t Walk” words or symbol. Vehicles must yield the right-of-way to pedestrians crossing when the “Don’t Walk” signal begins to flash.
  • A traffic control signal that stops all vehicular traffic but allows pedestrian
    traffic.
    Vehicles must yield the right-of-way to pedestrians crossing from corner to corner in an intersection when a “Walk” signal is present and traffic is stopped in all directions.

Pedestrians DO NOT have the right-of-way in the following situations:

  • A pedestrian who suddenly leaves a curb. A pedestrian cannot suddenly step off of a curb and onto the road in a moving vehicle’s lane.
  • A pedestrian control signal that reads “Don’t Walk” or shows the equivalent
    symbol.
    A pedestrian cannot enter or cross a roadway with a steady “Don’t Walk”
    signal.
  • A pedestrian who starts to cross the street as the control signal flashes “Don’t Walk” words or symbol. A pedestrian cannot begin to enter or cross a roadway when the “Don’t Walk” signal begins to flash.
  • A pedestrian who crosses a roadway at a point other than a crosswalk. A pedestrian must yield the right-of-way to all vehicles on the road when attempting to cross at any point other than the designated crossing area.

Safety Tips

The following are some safety tips:

  • To maximize visibility, pedestrians traveling at night should carry a flashlight and/or wear luminous clothing and avoid dark clothing.
  • After sundown, pedestrians should avoid walking near poorly-lit roadways with heavy
    traffic.
  • When possible, pedestrians should always cross at marked crosswalks or junctions.
  • Pedestrians should stroll on the sidewalk whenever feasible. When there are no
    sidewalks available, walkers should utilize the shoulder of the road and face traffic.

As a pedestrian, recovering after a vehicle collision can be difficult, which is why Tipton Law is here to help. If you or a loved one has been injured in a pedestrian-vehicle collision in Colorado, contact Tipton Law for a free consultation.

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